WASHINGTON — The Pentagon on Tuesday announced plans to send to Ukraine up to $400 million in ammunition, artillery, mortars, anti-aircraft and anti-armor weapons, armored personnel carriers and other equipment.

This weapons package will include 32 Stryker armored personnel carriers as well as more munitions for Patriot air defense systems; National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile Systems, or NASAMS; and High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems, or HIMARS.

The drawdown also includes Stinger anti-aircraft systems, 105mm and 155mm artillery rounds, 60mm and 120mm mortar rounds, TOW missiles and anti-armor systems and rockets such as the Javelin.

And the United States plans to send demolitions munitions for obstacle clearing, more than 28 million rounds of small arms ammunition and grenades, night vision and thermal imagery systems, tactical air navigation systems, spare parts and other assorted equipment.

The drawdown represents the 43rd time the U.S. has sent weapons and equipment from its own stockpiles to Ukraine, which is in the midst of a slowly proceeding counterattack against Russia. This presidential authority allows quick transfers of weapons and equipment to Ukraine, Pentagon officials have said.

The Defense Department has now committed more than $43 billion in security assistance to Ukraine since Russia launched its invasion in February 2022.

“The United States will continue to work with its allies and partners to provide Ukraine with capabilities to meet its immediate battlefield needs and longer-term security assistance requirements,” the Pentagon said in a statement.

Stephen Losey is the air warfare reporter for Defense News. He previously covered leadership and personnel issues at Air Force Times, and the Pentagon, special operations and air warfare at Military.com. He has traveled to the Middle East to cover U.S. Air Force operations.

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