Hours after North Korea fired three ballistic missiles off of its eastern coast on Wednesday, the U.S. and South Korea together launched some live-fire missiles of their own, U.S. Forces Korea confirmed in a statement.

The launch combined the capabilities of the U.S. Army Tactical Missile System and the Republic of Korea Hyunmu-2 missile system, according to the release.

“Missiles were fired from the northeast of South Korea into the East Sea,” the release said, as a means “to demonstrate the ability of the combined ROK-U.S. force to respond quickly to crisis events.”

North Korea’s launch, the first in roughly two weeks, came after President Joe Biden and South Korean President Yoon Seok-youl, during a Biden visit to Seoul last weekend, agreed to consider new military exercises to deter North Korean nuclear threats.

Following the launch, Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin spoke with South Korean Defense Minister Lee Jong-sup, according to a Wednesday release from the Pentagon.

“The two leaders strongly condemned today’s missile launches and pledged to work closely together to address the serious threat the DPRK’s provocative actions pose to the peace and stability of the Korean Peninsula, the region, and the global community more broadly,” the statement read.

Meghann Myers is the Pentagon bureau chief at Military Times. She covers operations, policy, personnel, leadership and other issues affecting service members. Follow on Twitter @Meghann_MT

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