Reese Dunklin, The Associated Press

  • The Pentagon logo is seen during a media briefing Oct. 21, 2014, in the press room of the Pentagon in Washington. (Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images)
    Military still struggles to handle kid-on-kid sex assaults

    The U.S. Department of Defense is struggling to change how it handles the abuse of military kids, including cases involving sexual assault by other children, according to a report commissioned by Congress.

  • New rules addressing sexual assault among the children of U.S. service members fail to fix a flaw that on many military bases has let alleged juvenile abusers escape accountability.
    Kids who assault on US military bases can still escape accountability

    Despite new rules addressing sexual assault among the children of U.S. service members, the federal government failed to fix a flaw that on many military bases has let alleged juvenile abusers escape accountability or treatment.

  • In this Jan. 31, 2018, photo, a mother whose daughter said she was sexually assaulted during first grade by a classmate at their elementary school on a U.S. military base in Germany stands in her daughter's bedroom at their new home in Colorado. The Associated Press is not identifying the girl's mother or father, a U.S. Army soldier, to protect the girl's identity. (David Zalubowski/AP)
    Under new law, military kids get sex assault protections

    The Defense Department must improve the way it responds to child-on-child sexual assault at military bases in the U.S. and abroad as part of a sweeping new law President Donald Trump signed Monday.

  • In this Jan. 31, 2018, photo, a mother whose daughter said she was sexually assaulted during first grade by a classmate at their elementary school on a U.S. military base in Germany stands in her daughter's bedroom at their new home in Colorado. The Associated Press is not identifying the girl's mother or father, a U.S. Army soldier, to protect the girl's identity. (David Zalubowski/AP)
    Senate orders Pentagon to review child-on-child sex abuse on military bases

    The Senate committee that oversees the U.S. military ordered an independent investigation of how the Defense Department handles sexual violence among children on bases as part of legislation that would overhaul how the Pentagon must respond when assaults are reported.

  • In this Jan. 31, 2018, photo, a mother whose daughter said she was sexually assaulted during first grade by a classmate at their elementary school on a U.S. military base in Germany stands in her daughter's bedroom at their new home in Colorado. The Associated Press is not identifying the girl's mother or father, a U.S. Army soldier, to protect the girl's identity. (David Zalubowski/AP)
    Military families feel deserted after sex assaults at base school

    Tens of thousands of children and teenagers live and attend school on U.S. military bases while their parents serve the country. Yet if they are sexually violated by a classmate, a neighborhood kid or a sibling, they often get lost in a legal and bureaucratic netherworld.

  • This undated photo posted on Facebook on April 30, 2016, shows Micah Johnson, who was a suspect in the slayings of five law enforcement officers in Dallas, July 7, 2016, during a protest over recent fatal police shootings of black men. Johnson, the Army reservist who killed five Dallas police officers, had kept an unauthorized grenade in his room on an Afghanistan base in 2014, according to a report released Friday, July 29, by Army officials investigating a sexual harassment complaint against him. (Facebook via AP)
    Army report: Grenade was found in room of Dallas gunman in 2014

    DALLAS — The Army reservist who killed five Dallas police officers had kept an unauthorized grenade in his room on an Afghanistan base in 2014, according to a report by Army officials investigating a sexual harassment complaint against him.

  • Investigators work in the area of downtown Dallas that remains an active crime scene, Saturday, July 9, 2016. Micah Johnson, an Army veteran, opened fire on police officers in the heart of Dallas Thursday, as hundreds of people were gathered to protest two recent fatal police shootings of black men, Philando Castile and Alton Sterling.(AP Photo/Eric Gay)
    Dallas suspect taunted police during 2 hours of negotiation

    The suspect in the deadly attack on Dallas police taunted authorities during two hours of negotiations, laughing at them, singing and at one point asking how many officers he had shot, the police chief said Sunday.