Justin Pritchard, The Associated Press

  • The Pentagon logo is seen during a media briefing Oct. 21, 2014, in the press room of the Pentagon in Washington. (Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images)
    Military still struggles to handle kid-on-kid sex assaults

    The U.S. Department of Defense is struggling to change how it handles the abuse of military kids, including cases involving sexual assault by other children, according to a report commissioned by Congress.

  • The Defense Department has been figuring out how to provide help and justice when the children of service members sexually assault each other on military bases since Congress required reforms in 2018. Those reforms are starting to rollout, but as one current case at Kadena shows, that rollout has been uneven. (Senior Airman Omari Bernard/Air Force)
    ‘How is this OK?’ Sex assault case haunts Air Force mothers

    For decades, justice has been elusive on American bases when the children of service members sexually assaulted each other. Help for victims and accountability for offenders was rare in the nearly 700 reports over a decade that an AP investigation documented.

  • New rules addressing sexual assault among the children of U.S. service members fail to fix a flaw that on many military bases has let alleged juvenile abusers escape accountability.
    Kids who assault on US military bases can still escape accountability

    Despite new rules addressing sexual assault among the children of U.S. service members, the federal government failed to fix a flaw that on many military bases has let alleged juvenile abusers escape accountability or treatment.

  • In this Jan. 31, 2018, photo, a mother whose daughter said she was sexually assaulted during first grade by a classmate at their elementary school on a U.S. military base in Germany stands in her daughter's bedroom at their new home in Colorado. The Associated Press is not identifying the girl's mother or father, a U.S. Army soldier, to protect the girl's identity. (David Zalubowski/AP)
    Under new law, military kids get sex assault protections

    The Defense Department must improve the way it responds to child-on-child sexual assault at military bases in the U.S. and abroad as part of a sweeping new law President Donald Trump signed Monday.

  • In this Jan. 31, 2018, photo, a mother whose daughter said she was sexually assaulted during first grade by a classmate at their elementary school on a U.S. military base in Germany stands in her daughter's bedroom at their new home in Colorado. The Associated Press is not identifying the girl's mother or father, a U.S. Army soldier, to protect the girl's identity. (David Zalubowski/AP)
    Senate orders Pentagon to review child-on-child sex abuse on military bases

    The Senate committee that oversees the U.S. military ordered an independent investigation of how the Defense Department handles sexual violence among children on bases as part of legislation that would overhaul how the Pentagon must respond when assaults are reported.

  • In this Jan. 31, 2018, photo, a mother whose daughter said she was sexually assaulted during first grade by a classmate at their elementary school on a U.S. military base in Germany stands in her daughter's bedroom at their new home in Colorado. The Associated Press is not identifying the girl's mother or father, a U.S. Army soldier, to protect the girl's identity. (David Zalubowski/AP)
    Military families feel deserted after sex assaults at base school

    Tens of thousands of children and teenagers live and attend school on U.S. military bases while their parents serve the country. Yet if they are sexually violated by a classmate, a neighborhood kid or a sibling, they often get lost in a legal and bureaucratic netherworld.